1890's Large Spode Copeland New Bridge Queen Charlotte Willow Platter

  • £175.00


#AD256

This is a large, late Victorian blue willow transferware blue & white 17 inch Spode Copeland ashet or meat plate. It is in truly stunning condition and is beautifully marked. There are no chips, cracks or repairs. This piece is simply beautiful. It would look great hung on a wall, or in use at a dinner table.

There are 3 versions of Spode's "Bridge" transferware patterns from the early to late 19th century Victorian era. They are known to Spode collectors as "Bridge 1" to "Bridge 2" to "New Bridge" here, which is also known as the "Queen Charlotte" pattern. Queen Charlotte 1744-1818 is said to have visited the Spode factory in 1817, a year before her death, to buy Spode wares. This Spode legend led to the pattern name, although it was manufactured about 70 years later.

Spode first introduced "Bridge" in about 1810, based on the Chinoiserie Oriental based patterns in the era of early Chinese export porcelain. In 1884, the same pattern was reworked and renamed as "New Bridge" and as we see, in very deep and stunning blue. The green backmark is transfer printed with the words "Spode Copeland England" and "Manufacturers-Stoke on Trent" This is an uncommon Spode backstamp or mark from the 1890-1900 Victorian to Edwardian era.

We refer you to a wonderful book by Robert Copeland entitled "Spode’s Willow Pattern and Other Designs After the Chinese", published in London by Studio Vista in 1999, 3rd edition. You can read a wonderful review of this book here.

Click images to see condition in close up views.

It has a "combed" back as seen in photos, and glossy soft finish, beautifully smooth in your hand, in pure Spode quality. This beautiful old piece was found in Manchester, North West England. We were very happy to find it and love the history of English willow pottery, which we have more of on our site.

Size: 17 x 13 inches
debra clifford antiques     Welcome! We have a 100% approval policy. Also visit Debra's other 2 sites: Ancestorville, with thousands of early signed vintage lost family photos of the 19th century for genealogy, and Vintage Poster Works, a vintage antique advertising site. email Debra with any questions here. We proudly use recycled packaging when we can.


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